Organizing Without Anti-Social Media

 
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Our Decolonial Philosophy

The Native Justice Coalition organizes successfully without anti-social media. It is not required to organize nor is it required to decolonize. The onslaught of shallowness, violence, harassment, bullying, and general ostracizing that takes place on these “platforms,” is egregious. It is also not a dialogue or a conversation by any means. Conversations happen on the phone or better yet in person. Our people have organized and lived without modern “technology” for a very long time and had beautiful systems in all aspects of our good life - mino bimadiziwin. Our technology is based in our teachings, wisdom, and culture. For example, Anishinaabe star knowledge is a technology but not as defined by majority culture science.

However you are welcome to share our information and event flyers on these platforms. The Native Justice Coalition’s leadership is Generation X and proud of it! We remember the good old days before selfies, likes, devices, and apps. We staunchly approve of old time ways of organizing and connection in an age of extreme disconnection.

Past Accomplishments

  • Our inaugural Anishinaabe Racial Justice Conference took place April 13-15, 2018, which had 32 speakers and 200 event attendees. We also had 60 walk ins who were mostly from the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community and nearby tribal communities such as Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa. This was during a huge spring snowstorm that covered the Great Lakes during our conference weekend.

  • We had successfully launched our Anishinaabe Healing Stories on Racial Justice Project in 3 Anishinaabe communities in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan in 2018! We had recruited 23 Story Sharers and had over 100 event attendees between the 3 communities.

  • We had two day long Anishinaabe Racial Justice Coalition meetings in the lower peninsula of Michigan in 2018. We held our coalition meetings in Naaminitigong (“the land beneath the trees” - Manistee - July) and Waawiyaatanong (“at the curved shores” - Detroit - December). We had 70 meeting attendees between the two locations.